Interactive Map

ICAPO is making strides in hawksbill conservation, strides that promise success for the future of the species:

Saving nests, recovering eggs and nurturing hatchlings. Gathering data and discovering new information about the species that informs new methodologies and policies. Converting poachers to protectors in the region and helping local communities and families find other means of livelihood.

 
 
 

Aserradores, Nicaragua

A newly discovered hawksbill nesting site of regional importance where nests are now protected. Click map marker to learn more.

 

La Salvia, Nicaragua

Spearheading bycatch reduction of hawksbill turtles in lobster gillnet fisheries. Click map marker to learn more.

 

El Maculis, El Salvador

Working with fishers to spearhead bycatch reduction of hawksbill turtles in lobster gillnet fisheries. Click map marker to learn more.

 

Costa Careyes, Mexico

Hosting the most hawksbill nesting along the Mexican Pacific. Click map marker to learn more.

 

Coiba National Park, Panama

A recently discovered hotspot, hosting the highest density of foraging hawksbills in the eastern Pacific. Click map marker to learn more.

 

Gorgona National Park, Colombia

An island that once served as a penitentiary is now a critical hawksbill foraging ground. Click map marker to learn more.

 

Punta Amapala, El Salvador

Protecting nests at one of the region's most important hawksbill nesting site. Click map marker to learn more.

 

Southern Rivas, Nicaragua

Empowering communities to protect hawksbills and other sea turtles along Nicaragua's southern Pacific coast. Click map marker to learn more.

 

Piura, Lambayeque and Bahia de Sechura, Peru

Working with fishers to quantify hawksbill bycatch and distribution in northwestern Peru. Click map marker to learn more.

 

San Ignacio-Navachiste-Macapule, Mexico

Spearheading sea turtle and wildlife research in the San Ignacio-Navachiste-Macapule lagoon system of Sinaloa. Click map marker to learn more.

 

Bahia Jaltemba, Mexico

A collaborative effort to document hawksbill nesting and foraging areas along the central Pacific coast of Mexico. Click map marker to learn more.

 

San Cristobal Island, Galapagos Archipelago, Ecuador

The importance of San Cristobal Island and the Galapagos Archipelago for hawksbills is only beginning to be discovered. Click map marker to learn more.

 

Mangroves of Tumbes National Sanctuary, Peru

Pioneering research to understand the importance of a large mangrove refuge on the border of Peru and Ecuador for adult and juvenile hawksbills. Click map marker to learn more.

 

Maruata and Colola, Mexico

A project focused on green turtles that recently initiated a hawksbill monitoring effort in foraging sites along Pacific Mexico. Click map marker to learn more.

 

Darien Gap-Choco region of Panama & Colombia

Pioneering efforts to identify important hawksbill nesting and foraging habitats in the largest remaining data gap in the eastern Pacific. Click map marker to learn more.

 

El Pardito and Isla Espiritu Santo, Mexico

Fishers leading efforts to monitor two major hawksbill foraging hotspots. Click map marker to learn more.

 

Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica

An in-water monitoring program focused on important populations of hawksbill and green turtles within the Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica. Click map marker to learn more.

 

Estero Padre Ramos Nature Reserve, Nicaragua

One of two major hawksbill nesting sites, hosting 40 percent of the known hawksbill nesting in the entire eastern Pacific. Click map marker to learn more.

 

Bahia Jiquilisco, El Salvador

One of two major hawksbill nesting sites, hosting 40 percent of the known hawksbill nesting in the entire eastern Pacific. Click map marker to learn more.

 

Machalilla National Park, Ecuador

Monitoring nesting females and hatchlings at the only hawksbill nesting site identified to date in South America. Click map marker to learn more.

1. Nesting beach conservation – Programs that focus on protecting hawksbill nests from poaching and other elements (feral animals, climactic events, etc.) in order to increase overall population size via hatchling production and release to the sea. These programs also seek to collect data on nesting female turtles, hatchlings and nest performance that can be used to better understand hawksbill biology and life-history. The majority of these programs employ local inhabitants as staff.

2. In-water monitoring – Programs that consistently implement tangle-nets, visual surveys or hand captures to generate information on hawksbill turtles in the marine environment (i.e. foraging habitats). Via these programs researchers gain insights into residency times, growth rates and dietary requirements of hawksbills, as well as connectivity between nesting and foraging areas, which enable better understanding of hawksbill biology and life-history.

3. Fisheries bycatch research/reduction [*Note: The term ‘bycatch’ is used for fish, turtles, marine mammals and other organisms that are caught (commonly mortal) unintentionally in a fishery that is designated to catch other fish. Nonselective fishing gear types that incur high rates of bycatch include gillnets, longlines, trawling and others] – Programs that work with fishermen to quantify hawksbill bycatch in industrial or artisinal fisheries via onboard fisheries observations or data collection at fishing ports. A focus on understanding fishery dynamics and trends, evaluating non-turtle bycatch, and seeking alternative, sustainable fishing gear is often a primary component of these programs.

4. Exploratory habitat investigations – Exploratory activities undertaken in an attempt to identify new and important habitats for hawksbill turtles. This often involves visiting coastal communities and fishing ports to conduct interview surveys with local inhabitants and glean information on potentially important sites for hawksbills. During these activities, project personal often conduct opportunistic in-water and beach monitoring to assist in identifying important foraging areas and nesting beaches, respectively.

5. Social science research – Programs that conduct studies at the local and international scale focused on topics including environmental conflict management, conservation policy, and community-based resource management, with emphasis on the interactions of primary resource users with hawksbills and their habitat.

6. Eco-tourism – Programs that aim to facilitate conservation tourism as a means to provide alternative sources of income to local community members and reduce extraction and/or unsustainable use of natural resources, including turtles and their habitats.

7. Protected area management and/or habitat protection – Programs that work directly with governmental institutions, non-profit organizations and/or community members to improve management and performance of protected areas, including parks, refuges, sanctuaries, reserves, etc. and/or programs that involve direct actions to improve and/or restore marine turtle habitats.

8. Outreach and education – Programs that include specific activities to raise awareness and provide education on hawksbills, oceans and general environmental stewardship themes.

9. Policy advocacy/activism – Programs that undertake actions to change laws and policies in order to provide greater benefits to marine turtles and the natural habitats upon which they depend.

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